April 15, 2019

Ramadan in Kuala Lumpur

Since Malaysia is considered as a Muslim country, the month of Ramadan is very important and taken seriously. Even if you are not a Muslim person, you should be careful with your actions during fasting and show your respect to people who are fasting.

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Since Malaysia is considered as a Muslim country, the month of Ramadan is very important and taken seriously. Even if you are not a Muslim person, you should be careful with your actions during fasting and show your respect to people who are fasting.

Ramadan is the ninth month of the Islamic calendar in which people fast during daylight, the meaning of not eating and drinking at all (include smoking) according to Islamic belief.

Fasting is not mandatory for Muslims who are pregnant or ill and for children. Each year, the month of Ramadan goes back a little bit. For example in 2018, it was between May 17 – June 14, and in 2019 it will be between May 6 – June 3. During Ramadan, people who are fasting eat mostly two times a day. First, when breaking the fast at sunset (Iftar); second, at night/early morning (suhur), before the sunrise.

After long hours, when breaking the fast, it is important what to eat because eating too much may cause upsetting the stomach. First, a couple of dates are eaten with some water. After preparing the stomach, a regular meal can be eaten.

What to eat in KL during Ramadan

Generally, local food and drinks are consumed when breaking fast including starters, main course, and dessert. It can be either served as a buffet style or plated.

In Kuala Lumpur, dishes like nasi lemak, Ayam percik, types of curries, nasi ayam, murtabak and more dishes are especially preferred for Iftar. Also, these are the types of food that are mainly served at Ramadan Bazaars which are opened daily around 16:00 every day during Ramadan.

Nasi lemak: Known as the iconic dish of Malaysia also preferred when breaking the fast. It is the beautiful combination of rice (cooked in coconut milk), roasted peanuts, cucumber, sambal sauce, and sometimes hard boiled egg and meat (chicken or beef).

Ayam percik: It is the Malaysian roasted or grilled and spiced chicken. The chicken is marinated with different types of spices (such as turmeric, cumin, and coriander), tamarind, lemongrass, and coconut milk. When the chicken is roasted, the gravy coated over becomes caramelized and delicious!

Nasi ayam: The Malay way of fried chicken and rice. The rice is steamed in chicken broth and they all served with savoury and sweet chilli sauce. The marination of chicken includes ingredients like garlic, ginger, soy sauce, oyster sauce, and sesame oil.

Murtabak: Delicious stuffed pancakes! Most commonly it is stuffed with minced meat (chicken or beef), garlic, eggs, and onion. It is generally consumed along with tomato sauce, sliced cucumber, and curry or gravy.

If you are travelling to Kuala Lumpur or going to live there, keep in mind that some Muslim restaurants or food stalls might be closed during the day (until Iftar). But still, there are many eating places that serve Chinese, Indian, Thai, Malay food, etc. Also, you may visit available street food stalls or order food online at any time.

Breaking fast is a ceremonial thing, that is why people prefer to eat all together at home or outside. Therefore, during Iftar (between 19:00-21:00 hours) most Malay eateries would be crowded more than usual. Because of that, food delivery in Ramadan, particularly during iftar dinners is much preferred.

If you would like to order food online with delivery, Smartbite is here for you!